Jump aboard the low-cost flight training revolution

If you think flight training is too expensive for you, think again. We’re in the midst of a flight training revolution. You can slash the cost of flight training by taking advantage of the modern aircraft and new technology that are at our fingertips creating low-cost flight training options.

Turning away from GA

In the past decade, we’ve seen the cost of flight training in traditional general aviation (GA) aircraft rise. These aircraft are usually older and equipped with fuel-hungry, high-maintenance engines that have a high running cost for the flight schools that maintain them.

Fewer students could afford flight training on these expensive aircraft, but where else can they go?

Luckily, something else has happened over this decade. Smaller, lighter aircraft with newer engines and technology have allowed us to do something that all challengers are meant to do — DISRUPT.

RA saves the day

The smaller, newer aircraft that we’re now seeing are usually registered under RAAus with call sign “numbers” on the aircraft. Most of these aircraft have a MTOW of 600kg and only carry two people. With this option now available, you can choose to undertake flight training on a brand new, 2-seater RA aircraft and pay $100 less per hour compared to the older generation 4-seater GA aircraft.

Crunch the numbers

Flying the RA plane costs around $4.5 per minute, whereas flying the GA plane costs around $6 per minute. This is a 25% saving if you choose the RA plane.

If you’re doing a PPL, this means you could easily save $6,000 throughout your training. This money could then go towards additional training such as a Multi-Engine Endorsement or Night VFR. At these low-cost flight training rates, it’s much more accessible for students to learn the basics of flying.

Experience the latest technology

RA aircraft like the Sling 2 or Bristell offer you the newest technology, such as:

  • Touch screen glass cockpit
  • Autopilot system 
  • Low fuel consumption rate  

They may have two seats instead of 4, but if you are doing flight training and most of the time you are flying with your instructor only — who cares? Especially if you are budget conscious and will get the same pilot licence no matter which aircraft you use for flight training. Many successful aviators over the last decade started as RA pilots. The RA aircraft are getting better and better; we believe the new golden age of flight training will be even more exciting.