Pilot training in Australia beyond 1 September 2018

Changes are afoot for pilot training in Australia. From 1 September 2018,  flying schools in Australia will be divided into 3 main types:

  • CASA Part 141 flying schools
  • CASA Part 142 flying schools
  • RAAus flying schools

Learn to Fly is a RAAus (Recreational Aviation Australia) flying school. Combined with our APTA (the Australian Pilot Training Alliance) membership our GA (General Aviation) Part 142 syllabus is CASA (Civil Aviation Safety Authority) certified.

GENERAL AVIATION (GA) PART 142 VS PART 141 FLYING SCHOOLS

If students want to undergo pilot training in Australia under CASA syllabus, they will need to choose either a Part 141 or Part 142 flying school.

At the moment, there are less than 10 fixed wing Part 142 flying schools in Australia, and we are very proud to be one of them.

WHY IS CHOOSING A PART 142 FLYING SCHOOL BETTER FOR STUDENTS?

  1. Less Training Hours: Part 142 flying schools are able to provide integrated training for CPL students within 150 hours, compared to the 200 hours of non-integrated training provided by a Part 141 flying school. This can save students learning with a Part 142 flying school up to 50 flying hours.
  2. GST saving: Part 142 flying schools provide integrated training which can be GST-free. Part 141 flying schools will be required to charge 10% GST on top of all of the other training fees.
  3. More Qualified Personnel: To be approved to conduct Part 142 training, flight schools are required to meet certain requirements. Personnel requirements meaning that they will always have a CASA-approved Safety Manager, Deputy Safety Manager, Quality Assurance Manager and Deputy Quality Assurance Manager.

RAAUS (RECREATIONAL AVIATION AUSTRALIA)

RAAus pilots are now able to privately hire aircraft and operate in to and out of a specific airspace through an RAAus flying school, including controlled airspaces.

Previously RAAus pilots could generally only fly solo flight at a non-controlled airport. With the introduction of the new guidelines, now RA pilots can fly solo from the airport at which the flying school is located. This saves a huge amount of time for students that may previously have had to travel to another airport to conduct their solo flights.

RAAus pilot training in Australia is the current trending preference in training for a number of reasons.

RAAus aircraft are generally newer and cheaper compared to traditional GA aircraft.

Additionally, converting from a RAAus licence such as the Recreational Pilot Certificate (RPC) to a GA licence like the Recreational Pilot Licence (RPL) is less stringent, meaning students can eventually get the same licence at a far cheaper cost – and be able to fly newer aircraft.

MAXIMUM TAKE OFF WEIGHTS

The Maximum Take-off Weight (MTOW) of RAAus aircraft is currently 600kg, but RAAus is in the process of having that weight limit increased to 750kg then to 1,500kg. When that happens, traditional training aircraft such as the Cessna 172 and Piper Warrior will be able to be registered under RAAus.

If the MTOW is successfully increased to 1,500kg, then it is likely that more flying schools will join RAAus, and GA Part 141 flying schools will become somewhat obsolete for purposes other than license conversions.